Author Topic: Vintage religious  (Read 1227 times)

mauriceman

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Vintage religious
« on: February 17, 2018, 10:21:08 AM »
I primarily engrave line art, reproductions and old metal type ornaments in my work. I have found vintage religious themes to be very popular and acquire a lot of ideas from the internet archive. I can't tell you exactly where I found this but I remember it was done by a "penman" around 1900. This one is a little over 8"X10" to fit a frame I had. Took about 6 1/2 hours using a 2.5w laser at 254ppi (resolution .1mm). It is on 3mm birch plywood that had been stained. My picture taking ability isn't that great, sorry. It is a little more "golden" in color and the frame is actually black.
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ianchia

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Re: Vintage religious
« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2018, 11:56:36 AM »
So beautifully done! Bravo. I love the detailed engraving and the typography. Did you tape over the piece with transfer tape before engraving, or did you prestain and then clean to remove any charring? The finished work is particularly crisp and clean. Wonderful job!

- Ian

Zax

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Re: Vintage religious
« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2018, 12:44:24 PM »
Excellent job! That's a very nice clean engraving with a lot of detail.

mauriceman

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Re: Vintage religious
« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2018, 01:04:09 PM »
I pretty much do all my plaques on 3mm birch plywood I get from ebay. I get a box of 40 12"X12" pieces about every other month. My workflow is like this:
Using an orbital sander (from Harbor Freight) I sand the best side with 150 grit then 220 grit. I then hand sand with 320 grit with the grain.
I apply my stain (I like Zar the best), let dry overnight then apply a mixture of 3 parts thinner to 1 part polyurethane with a folded paper towel. I then wipe off most of the poly mix.
This is just enough top coat to allow ease of removing the burn stain with alcohol but not require much additional "power" to burn through the poly.
After burning, I clean with alcohol, let dry and apply a coat of 100% polyurethane (I like satin) again using paper towels. I hate cleaning brushes. I again remove most of the poly with a paper towel.
There's enough poly in the burned sections to keep the "soot" in and a light top coat to make it a bit glossy.

This took me a year and a half of playing to get here. T2Laser all the way. It just works. I prep all my artwork before importing into T2Laser. Lots of testing.
Retired Industrial Electrician, PLC
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ianchia

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Re: Vintage religious
« Reply #4 on: February 17, 2018, 02:03:40 PM »
@mauriceman - Thank you very much for sharing the details of your special recipe. I will have to try it. I also hate cleaning brushes and usually resort to water based finishes, but your results speak for themselves. Amazingly crisp! I'll have to invest in some oil based stain and poly. Much appreciated.

- Ian

mauriceman

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Re: Vintage religious
« Reply #5 on: February 17, 2018, 02:43:25 PM »
I never had much luck with Mixwax Polycrylic, nice to work with but could never clean the burn stain completely. I used to brush on a coat of polyurethane, let cure for several days before engraving.  Since I burn usually at full power, I had to slow down the movement by 30%ish to get a nice dark line. You have to burn through the poly before hitting the wood, and that usually left 2 thin lines closely spaced with an unburned space between them. Pocket microscope showed me this. I tried thinning the poly and examining again through the lil scope until I found the sweet spot of 3 to 1. Works very well for me. I usually use Mixwax satin polyurethane but I don't think it matters much. I've tried the wipe on poly and Teak Oil alternatives but plain old polyurethane just works and doesn't cost much.
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ianchia

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Re: Vintage religious
« Reply #6 on: February 17, 2018, 02:48:47 PM »
@mauriceman - Unfortunately, Minwax isn't a brand that's easily available in Australia. I'll have to experiment! (-X Thanks for the additional tips!

- Ian

pbucc

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Re: Vintage religious
« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2018, 06:05:15 PM »
If you don't mind me asking what do you use get your files ready before bringing them into  t2?  I have experience with the adobe suit.  I want to do a memorial to my father for my mom and siblings. I know a lot of people don't like to let their secrets out as it a source of income.  Its not like that here. Everyone is supper helpful.
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ianchia

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Re: Vintage religious
« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2018, 02:32:49 PM »
@pbucc - if you look through @mauricemanís posts, youíll find plenty of great information. I know I have. :D

http://benboxlaser.us/index.php?action=profile;area=showposts;u=1047
« Last Edit: February 28, 2018, 05:08:48 PM by ianchia »

pbucc

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Re: Vintage religious
« Reply #9 on: February 26, 2018, 03:08:01 PM »
Thanks for the info. I was off sick today and started to play around.
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SteveK

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Re: Vintage religious
« Reply #10 on: March 10, 2018, 01:31:58 AM »
That's beautiful, haven't even considered doing something like that....til now

Steve

mauriceman

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Re: Vintage religious
« Reply #11 on: March 10, 2018, 07:04:48 AM »
Nice work! Like I said earlier, I find the religious "engravings" to be the most popular. If you search for "engravings religious" there are quite a few dating back to the late1400s to 1500s. Those artists were so talented.

I have no secrets for my lasering. In fact, being retired, I do all my work for free. The hobby keeps my mind extremely busy, between the electronics, mechanics and actual art. I'm currently running exhaust ductwork for a second engraver. Both use the Openbuilds ACRO frames.

Here's kind of how I do things. Regarding raster line engraving, if it's smaller than 8"X10" (approx A4), I will prepare my artwork at 254ppi (.1mm resolution) and engrave the same (most of the time). 8X10 (A4) usually is done at 167ppi (.15mm resolution). I prepare the artwork in Photoshop. Using the levels, black and white, posterization and smart sharpen adjustments, I get it down to just 2 colors, black and white. I might have to do some tweaking, erasing or pencilling in local areas.

For pictures with a lot of gray levels, I do similar tweaking as before but usually reduce the total number of gray levels. Then I use the bitmap diffusion dither in PS at 254ppi. I use PS CS5 which is circa 2010. I suppose the same could be done in Corel Draw of Gimp but never played with those softwares.

As always, my trash can is full every week with experiments and mistakes. The one I seem to do more than I like is forgetting to plug the laptop in and having the battery go dead in the middle of an engraving.
Retired Industrial Electrician, PLC
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pbucc

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Re: Vintage religious
« Reply #12 on: March 10, 2018, 07:21:02 AM »
Nice work! Like I said earlier, I find the religious "engravings" to be the most popular. If you search for "engravings religious" there are quite a few dating back to the late1400s to 1500s. Those artists were so talented.

I have no secrets for my lasering. In fact, being retired, I do all my work for free. The hobby keeps my mind extremely busy, between the electronics, mechanics and actual art. I'm currently running exhaust ductwork for a second engraver. Both use the Openbuilds ACRO frames.

Here's kind of how I do things. Regarding raster line engraving, if it's smaller than 8"X10" (approx A4), I will prepare my artwork at 254ppi (.1mm resolution) and engrave the same (most of the time). 8X10 (A4) usually is done at 167ppi (.15mm resolution). I prepare the artwork in Photoshop. Using the levels, black and white, posterization and smart sharpen adjustments, I get it down to just 2 colors, black and white. I might have to do some tweaking, erasing or pencilling in local areas.

For pictures with a lot of gray levels, I do similar tweaking as before but usually reduce the total number of gray levels. Then I use the bitmap diffusion dither in PS at 254ppi. I use PS CS5 which is circa 2010. I suppose the same could be done in Corel Draw of Gimp but never played with those softwares.

As always, my trash can is full every week with experiments and mistakes. The one I seem to do more than I like is forgetting to plug the laptop in and having the battery go dead in the middle of an engraving.
I bought the laser for custom invitations that my wife does. I wanted to do a photo of my dad who passed in november. I was thinking of 8x10 with his photo and the saying on his head stone  with the metal cross that was on the corners of his casket that me and my mother and siblings have at home. I was going to make the image in Photoshop then bring it in to inkscape to make the dxf file. Is this what you do?

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mauriceman

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Re: Vintage religious
« Reply #13 on: March 10, 2018, 10:14:30 AM »
If the image is all raster, then I just export it as a jpg at 100% quality. Sounds like you will have to either use grayscale or dither.  You will have to do a bunch of experimenting to get the different parts of the image to look close to each other. Here, Inkscape doesn't enter into the picture conversion. Inkscape and dxf are for vector drawings, this is bitmap or raster.

I typically take 1" square samples of the final image and burn them to determine the "power" setting. Since you will be putting together a "collage" from different images, you may have to do this for each part. You could either burn each part separately or adjust the "gray level" of each part to match.

What you see on your computer monitor is not what you will end up with on wood, trust me.
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ggallant571

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Re: Vintage religious
« Reply #14 on: March 10, 2018, 12:17:59 PM »
I use GIMP for 99.9% of my image processing and usually spend excessive amounts of time in image cleanup that others on this forum accomplish quicker with different tools and settings. 100mmx100mm  mirrors is my current favorite medium and I don't like pseudo random burn marks. All background gets set to white.
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