Author Topic: Time required per burn  (Read 838 times)

ThaJDJ

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Time required per burn
« on: October 12, 2016, 02:43:38 PM »
The main thing I have not been able to figure out is what the numbers mean in the settings!  I am burning 290mm x 89mm name tags into paint sticks. Benbox v3.7.99, Banggood 2.5w engraver. I see no difference in "speed" from 1500-3500. Is higher faster or slower?  "Time" does this = "dwell"? "Step" seems to be number of itenerations the engraver repeats.
I have not found ANY of this info on the forum, nor in searches!
(My current project using an EMF vector image takes about 3 hours EACH to burn.  Is this typical?)

Agastar

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Re: Time required per burn
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2016, 02:53:39 PM »
Check out Banggood's youtube channel. They have a video about how to setup benbox and the laser and the guy in the video talks about the settings a little bit.

Also, 3 hours seems a but much but without seeing what you are trying to engrave it's hard to say for sure.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2016, 02:54:18 PM by Agastar »

Administrator

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Re: Time required per burn
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2016, 03:32:02 PM »
Welcome to the forum @ThaJDJ.

Can you post your image?
Admin -- Ralph -- support @ BenCutLaser dot us
http://www.BenCutLaser.us/BenCutLaserSetup1.8.4a.exe.zip
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via Paypal to bclpp@primemail.com

Zax

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Re: Time required per burn
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2016, 04:49:55 PM »
It's been a while since I've used Benbox, but if I remember correctly Time is only for discrete and is the dwell time and Speed is only for Continuous. Step is the distance for jog, nothing to do with the engraving.

ThaJDJ

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Re: Time required per burn
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2016, 05:08:27 PM »
Check out Banggood's youtube channel. They have a video about how to setup benbox and the laser and the guy in the video talks about the settings a little bit.

Also, 3 hours seems a but much but without seeing what you are trying to engrave it's hard to say for sure.

I watched every video I could find on their channel, and others and NONE of them covered the topics I asked.
I may be able to post the Image used later, it is on a different computer.
Burn took 4:45:26.  I don't have all the settings on this computer, but will be able to post more later.

Agastar

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Re: Time required per burn
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2016, 05:35:17 PM »

Madmark

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Re: Time required per burn
« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2016, 09:02:45 PM »
DPI is 254 or 0.1mm. If your image density (DPI) is too high your lase will take longer & overburn.

Scan
Moves like an old dot matrix printer, starts at left, scans to right, return and repeat 1016 time for a 4" logo.

Z Scan
Same as above but lases in both directions. May drift a bit during burn. Twice as fast as Scan alone.

Time (dwell) matters for these two modes. Smaller Time = less dwell = faster / weaker lasing. Speed is the slew speed while not lasing.

Speed is in mm / Min. Bigger is faster.

Outline
Speed controls lase speed in mm / Min. Slow speeds can ignite your workpiece. Outline will lase both sides of a single pixel line except for .DXF files which will only lase lines & circles (no text).

M
GearBest A5 - 1600mW
LX-5 controller w/single MOSFET & GRBL jumper
Benbox 3.7.99
AutoCAD 2k .DXF
Ancient 2GB Dell Optiplex w/USB scanner

ThaJDJ

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Re: Time required per burn
« Reply #7 on: October 13, 2016, 03:52:00 PM »
Attached is the Image.  I keep a text log of settings:
Project: Fellowship With God Name Badges
Material: Paint Stir Stick  <--- I gallon sized (10 per $1)
Image: FWGFtemplate.emf
Sized: [W x H mm] 301.18 x 97.68 <---This is the benbox resize to fit stock material
Speed: 3000
 Time: 1
 Step: 1
Carve Mode: Scan by Z
 Discrete
Time per cycle: By [Line: 04:48:26] By Z: 3:30
Note: Name added via Benbox text function sized 10, position added same manner sized 5.

Also Benbox, while allowing me to select a font, always uses Arial.

ThaJDJ

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Re: Time required per burn
« Reply #8 on: October 13, 2016, 04:02:48 PM »
Did you see this one?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zhRTTEySREU

Yes.  Note he only starts talking about those settings at 2:50 and does not say if going up or down is faster moving.  He used 1000, and said it was not burning enough.  Mine is set at 3000 and slightly over-burns.  He also shows engraving cardboard.  At the lightest settings, mine catches cardboard on fire, and almost instantly burns through the material.
I have a stock 2.5 watt violet laser.

ThaJDJ

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Re: Time required per burn
« Reply #9 on: October 13, 2016, 04:07:11 PM »
DPI is 254 or 0.1mm. If your image density (DPI) is too high your lase will take longer & overburn.

Scan
Moves like an old dot matrix printer, starts at left, scans to right, return and repeat 1016 time for a 4" logo.

Z Scan
Same as above but lases in both directions. May drift a bit during burn. Twice as fast as Scan alone.

Time (dwell) matters for these two modes. Smaller Time = less dwell = faster / weaker lasing. Speed is the slew speed while not lasing.

Speed is in mm / Min. Bigger is faster.

Outline
Speed controls lase speed in mm / Min. Slow speeds can ignite your workpiece. Outline will lase both sides of a single pixel line except for .DXF files which will only lase lines & circles (no text).

M
Thank you for this.  I posted the image (vector file) in another comment. it appears to be a 96 x 96 DPI.  Also a copy of my settings.
I have mine set at the fastest I've seen demonstrated, and still get an overburn. (My material is a soft wood, pine, anyway.)